Tim is following his dream of making an impact on the world through his passion for leadership and experiences in chemistry.

Tim is a Senior chemistry major, captain of the soccer team, and president of the local fraternity Phi Pi Alpha. In Spring 2016, he was awarded the Chemistry Department Award for Academic Excellence. He graduated in the top 10% of his class from the Marine Corps Officer Candidate School last summer, and will be commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant following his graduation from Emory & Henry College. Of his decision to join the Marine Corps, Tim says, “This career gives me the opportunity to serve and to know that I am making a difference. I also look forward to the physical and mental challenges that come with this leadership role.” Throughout his career, he hopes to continue his education in chemistry, evidenced by his current research—testing sensing techniques related to homemade explosives. 

We believe the best way to learn about our Honors Program is from our students. Therefore, we used this opportunity to ask Tim some questions that you may have been wondering.

Q: How did your involvement in the Honors Program influence your experience at Emory & Henry College? Was Emory & Henry your first choice?
A: Emory & Henry was not my first choice initially, however when I visited the campus and spend some time with some of the students, I was hooked. Being in the Honors Program has really given me the opportunity to explore outside my academic comfort zone and become a well-rounded student. The program pushes you to think more and do more outside of your individual discipline, which is essential in the development of young scholars.

I encourage all future Honors students to continue to push their academic boundaries, and while doing so remain humble and curious.…Don’t think that you are always the smartest person in the room, because there is always something you can learn from someone else.
Tim Coulter

Q: What advice would you give to a first-year Honors Scholar?
A: I encourage all future Honors students to continue to push their academic boundaries, and while doing so remain humble and curious. Your professors and your peers are your best resources at Emory & Henry, so take every opportunity you have to learn something new from a professor, a mentor or a friend. Don't think that you are always the smartest person in the room, because there is always something you can learn from someone else. 

Q: How would you describe the character of the Honors Program?
A: 
I believe that the Honors Program does a great job of cultivating curiosity and a desire to learn in young college students.

Q: What was the most rewarding aspect of being in the Honors Program?
A: 
The most rewarding aspect of the Honors Program has been the research opportunities that it presents. It has given me, as well as the rest of the students in the program, an opportunity to pursue a higher level of learning on a subject that I am truly passionate about. The work that you put into your honors thesis is long, difficult and at times tedious. But it is certainly rewarding, and the resources that the program provides to allow students to do this are beyond value.